Freshman Year: “Major” Indecision

    Posted in College, Lifestyle, Love

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Everyone has learning experiences freshman year of college. We learn to stay away from the Jungle Juice if we want to keep our heads out of toilets and trash cans, we learn that skipping class can only lead to slipping GPAs, and most importantly, we hope to learn what we want to do with our lives. Some of us go into college with our careers already laid out, and every step of the way planned. Those lucky few dash through advisor meetings in less than five minutes, their transcript following their 4 year plan to a tee.

And then there is me.

My transcript veers through the course catalog like a tiny geriatric attempting to ferry her car through a Wal-Mart parking lot. My long-suffering advisor looks at my transcript and schedules another thirty minutes for our meeting. My major first changed at Orientation after I took one look at the sample Political Science schedule and saw “Microeconomics” shamelessly emblazoned upon it. I’m a flake when it comes to big decisions like this, and it shows in my spotty track record with trying to pick a major. If there was a Indecisive Majors Anonymous, I’d be a repeat attender.

I’m commitment phobic when it comes to my major. By the time the honeymoon is over, usually after two or three months, I’m flirting shamelessly with unrelated courses. Already, I’ve split with Political Science and Biology. I was with Undecided for an extremely brief period, namely the two minutes it took to leave my Biology advisor’s bizarrely elephant-themed office and walk to the Undecided office, at which point I begged Poli Sci to take me back.

Now, four or five months later, I’m a Political Science major with a wandering eye. I like to blame my friend K., whose switching majors to become an event planner catalyzed the current indecision I’m mired in. Like any habitual flake, I see greener grass everywhere else, and now I’m caught in the place where “Fun” meets “Functional.”  A fun major is something like journalism, which I’d really love to do. I still daydream about a journalistic future in the land of “what if” (which is a neighboring land to the land of joblessness). A functional major is Political Science, which actually has jobs available after graduation. Plus, with the economy where it is now, people no longer say “You should study what appeals to you” when you mention your tentative major. Nobody can afford to anymore.

So I’ve decided to at least wait another semester before I decide to make another switch in majors. Political Science is the safe bet, and the introductory classes are rumored to be designed to weed out the flaky (i.e. me in Biology). A little extra time will allow me the chance to find out if I’m truly afraid of “major” commitment, or if this major decision is actually right for me.

What do you think? Is your major for love, or money?

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