Making The Most Of Your Senior Year

I’m two days deep into my senior year and already all the other seniors are acting as if it’s the end of times. If the Mayans are right, it may be the end of times for us seniors and we may never actually graduate. This view is more than a little morose, but I think it’s just more of a reason for us to live it up and make the most out of senior year. This series is my attempt to have the best and most memorable senior year.

Any good senior should start her year off by making a bucket list. A bucket list may sound like a cliched endeavor, but a bucket list is the most effective to way to remember all of your future plans. I can’t recount how many times my friends and I would say, “Let’s go to that restaurant!” or “Let’s learn to salsa!” Our memories tend to be more along the lines of senior citizens than seniors in college, so a lot of potential experiences fall by the wayside. By writing a bucket list, you’re more prone to remember these activities and places to go, so that you do get the most experiences out of your senior year.

Plus, a bucket list makes everything that much more epic. You know in those high school movies how the characters make a bucket list of things to do before they graduate, and then they spend the rest of the movie getting into crazy hi-jinks? Well, think of your bucket list and the things you do as the movie montage of your life that you want to to look back on. Crossing off the items on your bucket list is also a great way to spend time with your friends and bring your group closer together. Senior year is also the last time your friend group will really be together without having to make an effort. This will probably be the last time all of your friends are in the same area, so make the most of it while you still can.

Now that I’ve convinced you to make a senior bucket list, here’s some tips to getting one started:

1. See if your college has a bucket list of the school traditions. A lot of times, the university will print it in the school paper or somewhere online.

2. Get your closest friends together and have a brainstorming session. It’s easier and much more fun to make a bucket list as a group than by yourself.

3. Come from a place of “yes.” Basically, this means that this time may be one of your last opportunities to do something crazy before you’re expected to act like an adult. Only don’t conflate crazy with dangerous, it’s your senior year, not the time for a death wish.

4. Stick to what you write down. Anything you write on your list should be something you really want to do. It shouldn’t be a chore to do any of the activities on your list; if it is, then take it off.

5. Have fun!

[lead image via Hasloo Group Production Studio/shutterstock.com]

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