The Nine-to-Five Toning Session: Sculpt the Perfect Butt and Legs at Work [CC's ShapeU]

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Among the many amazing things I’ve learned at my summer internship, realizing the challenges of working a nine-to-five office job was a less welcome lesson than most. Don’t get the idea that I’m ungrateful – I mean, I totally loved my experience as an intern and appreciate all that I’ve learned, but I think we can all agree that office jobs are a bit of a drag no matter what they entail, especially when it comes to managing and maintaining a workout routine. But just because we’re on the clock doesn’t mean we can’t take our workout to the office.

As someone who was totally accustomed to teaching six fitness classes a week, and planning my workouts around my extremely flexible class schedule, dedicating a solid block of eight hours a day to sitting in an office was not easy…and finding the motivation to workout after was probably as difficult as Anthony Weiner NOT sexting his goodies (yeah, that kind of difficult). So to keep things interesting, and work on something other than “administrative assistance,” which is intern code for “I stuffed envelopes of information for three hours straight,” these two office workout kept my sanity alive, and my fitness in-check!

Check out the super-easy office toning session from fitness guru Denise Austin:

There’s no excuses when toning your butt and legs is made this simple!  Try it out the next time you need a five minute break at the office and see how great you feel after. You get a mental break from work and a short and sweet toning workout for your lower-body! All you need for the workout is an office chair, which is what makes this office-friendly workout so perfect! Try it in your cubicle, during your lunch break, or even while you’re waiting for those 200 copies to print.

Want more? Check out this lower-body office routine. It’s the perfect compliment to the butt and leg workout: combine the two, or switch off each day for a well-rounded office routine. Whoever said “working hard or hardly working” clearly never took fitness to the office: perhaps “working hard or woking out” is better suited for our purposes.

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