Science Has Defined ‘Booty Call’ And ‘One-Night Stand’ Because There Is A Big DIFF

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    Posted in Dating, Love

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Amongst curing cancer, HIV/AIDS and finding a boner solution for adult males, science has also been spending her time (and funding) studying the elusive “booty call” and “one-night stand.” Like absolutely none of us have pondered, what actually is the difference between a “booty call” and a “one-night stand” besides the fact that you probably know the trifling mofo who is calling you at 3:00 AM for some trim?

Peter Jonason, a psychologist at the University of Western Sydney in Australia, surveyed 192 undergraduate students—124 women and 68 men—at the University of West Florida. He asked each participant to describe the utility of different kinds of sexual relationships (long-term, one night stand, booty calls, etc.).

According to the study, “The predominate function of long-term relationships was social support, followed by being a trial run or a placeholder, with sex bringing up the rear.” Sounds about right. We seek long-term relationships for companionship and sometimes we may date someone who is more “Right Now” than “Right.”

The study SHOCKINGLY, /sarcasm, found, “Booty calls were primarily for sex, with placeholder coming in as the second function and trial run coming in third. Social support came in dead last.” No shit, Sherlock.

“Sex and placeholder tied for first as the main function of friends-with-benefits relationships, with trial run coming in third and support, again, coming in last place. Finally, one-night stands were for sex, participants agreed, with placeholder second, trial run third and social support last.”

So ‘booty calls’ and ‘one-night stands’ are primarily for sex? Who would have thought? In any case, what Jonason found was that one-night stands were less “touchy feely” than booty calls, meaning there were fewer emotions involved. All of this is shocking to no one but as Live Science points out it’s imperative that those who study sex have empirical evidence to define the ways cultures utilize and engage in sex.

[Via. Live Science / Shutterstock/Sam72]

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