Is Your Major Too Practical?

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Last summer, Business Insider compiled a list of career choices that millennials tend to skip over. The list, which included options like land surveying and court stenography, wasn’t meant to knock those who chose more traditional paths but to offer “potential alternatives to spending four years on a degree and racking up student loans, or potential alternative paths to people who graduate and find themselves working in retail,” according to author Max Nisen.

You’d think that top 10 majors – like business administration, nursing and political science among others in this Princeton Review list – would be surefire ways to land a job, but nope. Emerald wrote about the uninspiring unemployment rates that recent college graduates face – 19 million 4-year college graduates expected over from 2010 to 2020 will find only 8.5 million job openings requiring a bachelors degree over the same period.

So should students and recent grads like me pursue off-the-beaten-path careers? According to some of my family and friends, journalism’s already an impractical choice (though no one can talk me out of it). There are already schools that offer degrees in bowling industry management and boilermaking, and Jezebel wrote about UC Davis’ possible coffee degree program. Though these may not be the most sensible offerings to some, maybe those who choose them are having better luck than the liberal arts crowd. Maybe.

I made the conscious decision to follow wherever my passion takes me. Call me crazy (and broke), but I’m not pursuing my career for the money. I’m going after my goals because that’s the only way I’ll find inner fulfillment. But in the near future when I return to school for my master’s, I wouldn’t mind taking a class outside of my comfort zone…something that I regret not doing during undergrad. Learning a new trade could only help, not hurt, right? Watch this video on UC Davis’ coffee course and let me know.

[Lead image via You Go Getter]

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