Fact or Fiction: Does Juice Really Make You Taste Better?

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WomanDrinkingOrangeJuice-850x565Last week, Erykah Badu gave some unwarranted but omg totally welcome relationship advice that had the tweets talking.

If we should listen to anyone, it should probably be Erykah and her Baduizm. Not only is she completely brilliant and completely gorgeous with unparalleled talent, but her milkshake – err…or glass of juice? – consistently brings all the boys to the yard.

Oh…and dat ass.

erykah-badu

[Image via imperfectenjoyment.com]

While her tweet spread across the twitterverse and probably into the bedrooms of many devoted fans, it had me wondering – is it really true?

I heard the rumor about juicy benefits from a classmate, Alex, in the 12th grade. I was a transfer student, but her reputation preceded her…if you catch my drift. I’d known her for all of two weeks before she pulled me to the corner of our AP US History class and shared her secret.

“Pineapple juice makes you taste good,” she smirked. “I tried it on Terrell, my boyfriend. It makes a HUGE difference.”

Alex isn’t a doctor or scientist, to my knowledge…but she’s not the only one with that theory. The adventurous folks at YourTango enlisted a couple to try out a few earthly goodies – including pineapple juice, excluding cranberries (sorry, Erykah!) – before oral. So should we believe the hype? Read the story and find out.

[Lead image via]

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