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Stanford Sexual Assault Survivor Named One Of Glamour’s Women Of The Year

Stanford Rape Survivor Woman Of The Year

Ramin Talaie/Getty Images

“Emily Doe,” the anonymous sexual assault survivor who was raped by Stanford University student Brock Turner, was just named one of Glamour‘s Women of the Year. She gave a powerful speech during Turner’s trial, giving a voice to sexual assault survivors everywhere and causing a country to stand up in protest against a broken judicial system that favors rapists rather than sexual assault survivors.

“You don’t know me, but you’ve been inside me, and that’s why we’re here today,” Doe, 23, said as she addressed Turner in court earlier this year. “You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice, until today.”

“Future reference, if you are confused about whether a girl can consent, see if she can speak an entire sentence,” she said: “I am not just a drunk victim at a frat party… while you are the All American swimmer at a top university… I am a human being who has been irreversibly hurt.… You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice, until today.”

She then went on to describe the graphic details: standing nude in the hospital while nurses held a ruler to the abrasions on her body, how she found out details of her attack while reading a news story at work, how news outlets still referred to Turner as a Stanford swimmer rather than what he actually was — a rapist. However, despite her important message, Turner was only sentenced to six months in jail and was let go after serving a measly three. But no amount of injustice can shift away from Doe’s powerful words.

After she was officially named one of Glamour‘s Women of the Year, Doe spoke out again about the case and what happened after Turner’s sentence was announced.

“From the beginning, I was told I was a best case scenario,” she begins. “I had forensic evidence, sober un­biased witnesses, a slurred voice mail, police at the scene. I had everything, and I was still told it was not a slam dunk. I thought, if this is what having it good looks like, what other hells are survivors living? I’m barely getting through this but I am being told I’m the lucky one, some sort of VIP. It was like being checked into a hotel room for a year with stained sheets, rancid water, and a bucket with an attendant saying, No this is great! Most rooms don’t even have a bucket.”

She then went on to explain her disbelief when the sentencing was announced. “I yelled half of my statement. So when it was quickly announced that he’d be receiving six months, I was struck silent. Immediately I felt embarrassed for trying, for being led to believe I had any influence. The violation of my body and my being added up to a few months out of his summer. The judge would release him back to his life, back to the 40 people who had written him letters from Ohio. I began to panic; I thought, this can’t be the best case ­scenario. If this case was meant to set the bar, the bar had been set on the floor.”

But her words resonated with survivors all over the world, and she came away with strength. She also reminded women everywhere that they are not the problem — rapists are. “If you think the answer is that women need to be more sober, more civil, more upright, that girls must be better at exercising fear, must wear more layers with eyes open wider, we will go nowhere.”

Thank you. Read the full essay on Glamour.

Related TopicsNews Stanford University
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