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The 5 Best Ways To Give Your Resume A Professional Boost

resume interview tips

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The dreaded resume. Updating your resume is a necessary evil: It’s something many of us hate having to do, but without a resume makeover, our chances of landing our dream jobs and internships are slim to none.

But, oftentimes, even after slaving away on a resume for hours and days at a time, you still don’t get the results (or the callbacks) that you had hoped for in the beginning. Where did you go wrong? From formats to font to details, it’s possible that there are a good amount of simple mistakes hidden in plain sight on your resume. If you’re tired of sending your resume to employer after employer and not getting the results you want, consider a few of these five small boosts.


1. Make sure it’s reader friendly.

Playing with fonts is fun, but make sure your love of funny fonts isn’t costing you jobs. When picking a font to use for your resume, you should be thinking of two things: Making sure that you’re only using one font, not including your name, and keeping the font simple and easy to read. Once you have that figured out, make sure your font is large enough (but not too large) for a hiring manager to read.


2. And pay attention to your format.

You might be doing it wrong if your resume is a template that you found in Microsoft Word. It’s 2016, which means it’s time for your resume to get a little creative. If you have a way with Photoshop, you can start there. If not, there are also multiple websites that offer hundreds of creative templates to help your resume stand out.


3. Be specific…

When crafting your resume, don’t just assume that a potential employer is a mind reader. Go into detail about what it is that you did when you held a certain position so that whoever reads your resume can understand how your experience relates to the position you’re applying for.


4. …but also, get to the point.

It can be a bit difficult, but the best way to make sure your resume doesn’t end up in the trash is to make sure you’re able to say a lot by saying a little. That means keeping your blurbs and descriptions to one to two lines per bullet point and/or trying your hardest to make sure you’re able to fit every single detail on one page.


5. Focus on your accomplishments.

So you were a social media intern at a popular company? Good for you. Just make sure that, when you list your intern duties on your resume, you don’t get generic and explain to a potential employer that you spent three to six months “posting content on all social media platforms,” because that’s a given. Instead, go into how you might have improved your brand’s reach across certain platforms and how you were able to promote certain content. In terms of trying to make someone hire you, writing “Increased social media activity by 25%” sounds a whole lot better than “Scheduled content to post on Facebook,” so don’t sell yourself short.

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