Wonder Woman Is Promoting Think Thin Bars In The Worst Advertising Call Since Pepsi

DC Entertainment, Inc

Wonder Woman was trained to be an unconquerable warrior. She fights with unflinching strength and courage alongside men. She takes risks and sacrifices her safety in order to save the world and to discover her true powers.

She also is, apparently, preoccupied with her weight — at least if this new, tone-deaf partnership with Think Thin bars is anything to go by.

Wonder Woman is the first female-driven superhero film Warner Brothers has ever released, Allure reports, and with that comes no small amount of pressure. Along with many of my female friends, I am fervently hoping that the film will perform well with men and women alike, sending the message to production companies that more female-driven films should be made, both superhero and otherwise.

While it’s a relief that Warner Brothers is promoting the film at all, this isn’t exactly a progressive marketing move. In a society that already teaches us that thinness is equatable with desirability and professional success, a superhero who lauds her power from her physical appearance is just about the last role model we need — and after Kendall Jenner’s tone-deaf Pepsi ad, one would think companies would take a bit more care in their advertising decisions.

According to Think Thin’s website, the brand “believe[s] that women should never have to feel guilty about what they eat.” But shouldn’t Wonder Woman be a bit more concerned with saving the world than second-guessing her food choices and lamenting their effect on her body?

Wonder Woman is supposed to be an empowering figure. In a society where women are body-shamed at Lululemon and a show called Revenge Body exists (incentive for being thin should never be validation from others), we are reminded again and again that those who are thin are superior.

It’s the exact kind of harmful stereotype we were hoping this film would eschew.

Molly ThomsonCOLLEGECANDY Writer
Writer. Boxed mac & cheese aficionado. I tried to start a girl-band when I was 12.
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