Did Bob Dylan Really Use SparkNotes For A Speech?

Bob Dylan Nobel Peace Prize

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Bob Dylan truly doesn’t care about his Nobel Peace Prize in literature. The rock legend has been acting very chill about his accomplishment and now he’s being accused of plagiarizing large parts of his speech from none other than SparkNotes. Yup, the website that everyone used in high school when they forgot to do the assigned English reading is what Dylan used as “inspiration” for his Nobel Peace Price speech.

Dylan was awarded his Nobel Peace Prize in October 2016. From there, he took a leisurely two weeks to respond and accept the award. Why would anyone take that long to accept and Nobel Peace Prize? It’s a Nobel Peace Prize! The American singer then skipped the Nobel ceremony in December, because why not. Now he finally delivered his acceptance speech electronically and it’s riddled with plagiarism and this isn’t the first time he’s been accused of plagiarism.

Slate first noticed the similarities in Dylan’s speech to SparkNotes because when quoting one of his literary influences Moby-Dick, he made up a quote. Yes, he just won the Nobel Peace Prize in literature but that doesn’t mean he can go about making up quotes from literary staples. The quote Dylan made up was supposedly said by a Quaker priest and was, “some men who receive injuries are led to God, others are led to bitterness.” That quote doesn’t exist in Herman Melville’s novel, but on SparkNotes character description for Father Mapple it says, “someone whose trials have led him toward God rather than bitterness.”

If Dylan turned his speech in as a high school English paper it is doubtful that it would pass any anti-plagiarism requirement.

Sarah WeingartenCOLLEGECANDY Writer
Writer and social media addict. When I'm not scrolling through various timeline's I'm researching skin care regiments and watching the Cleveland Cavaliers.
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