Don’t Know What To Do With All Your Stuff?

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Moving SUCKS. In any capacity, really — from apartment to apartment, dorm room to home room, home room to dorm room, even across a room. Generally, I try to move as little as possible.

So when I was told by my landlord that I needed to be out of my apartment by May 31st because of “renovations,” I was a little upset. To add insult to injury, the landlord also informed me that these “renovations,” which include but are not limited to things like granite countertops and slate flooring (things a college student really needs!), would cause my little studio’s rent to increase by $150.

Not. Cool. I had no choice but to move.

Despite my bitterness over being uprooted so suddenly and heartlessly, I tried not let the situation stress me out. The entire year, I had prided myself on living lightly, frugally — It seemed as if my only possessions were a frying pan, a laptop, and a rainbow assortment of tank tops. Moving, I thought, would be a cinch. Just throw everything into a box and haul ass.

Not so much. Even though my apartment looked sparsely chic, my crap managed to fill five huge boxes and three duffel bags. I was totally overwhelmed by how much stuff I had, and how much stuff I had that I didn’t even want. Like that Brita water filter I meant to use all the time. My dust buster (gift from grandma). The mini can of mace I just never got around to putting on my keychain.

Good news — apparently, my sentiments are common among college students living in dorms. Come move – out time, purportedly lazy (but more likely distressed) co – eds tend to leave behind valuables they simply can’t deal with. Many schools have started donating these items to charity or selling them in huge bazaars, and then donating the proceeds (Penn State raised $20,000 last year in a mock – yard sale).

Now you don’t have to feel so guilty about leaving behind that mini – fridge, or, on the flipside, you can buy someone’s discarded something for dirt cheap. With all the stuff I have, I know that’s a load off my mind.

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