#BlackOutDay Sweeps Twitter & The Posts Are Absolutely Beautiful

#BlackOutDay is trending on Twitter right now and it’s filling our newsfeed with some seriously gorgeous photos. For anyone who doesn’t know, this is the second year for the social media event, which the creator describes as “celebrating the beauty of Blackness,” something he finds to be of “the UTMOST importance.”

According to the site’s mission statement, the movement started on Tumblr.

T’von(expect-the-greatest)suggested that there be a day on Tumblr, within the black tumblr user population, where we like and reblog selfies of each other and fill our dashboards with encouragement. When Marissa Rei (blkoutqueen) came up with the name “TheBlackout” the movement was officially born. In our initial push, we spread the word via tumbr posts and as the movement grew, graphic designer nukirk (moderator of the popular blog whatwhiteswillneverknow) created social media logos that aided the jump from tumblr to the rest of social media.

Our goal is to continue celebrating the many different manifestations and nuances of blackness.Through monthly themes, open dialouge, and a selfie or two, we hope our participants showcase themselves and their talents and build a strong network of encouragement and support.

On March 6th, the first official #BlackOutDay took place and it instantly became a success. The hashtag trended on numerous social media platforms and got a huge response. Today marks the second year if the movement, and our Twitter feed is overflowing with some amazing tweets.

Check them out:

https://twitter.com/saharla_/status/739847838566371328

https://twitter.com/khule95/status/739847609628643328

https://twitter.com/__badgalny/status/739847496369737728

https://twitter.com/sabrynlaila/status/739847293805993984

https://twitter.com/souledsunflower/status/739847229708587008

https://twitter.com/CoCo_Makana/status/739845986101628930

https://twitter.com/briballa143/status/739844334913085440

Our thoughts exactly.

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