Affirmative Action Upheld By U.S. Supreme Court in University of Texas Case

|
Getty

Getty

In 2008, Abigail Fisher applied to the University of Texas. The problem? She didn’t get in. But instead of getting over it—like a normal person—Fisher decided to sue the university.

In 2012, Fisher’s suit claimed that she was denied entrance into the school of her choice because she was white. You see, the University of Texas has affirmative action—which show special consideration to people belonging to racial minority groups—and it was because of this policy, not her grades, that Fisher was excluded.

“I was taught from the time I was a little girl that any kind of discrimination was wrong,” she said in 2012. “And for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me. What kind of example does this set for others? A good start to stopping discrimination would be getting rid of the boxes on applications — male, female, race, whatever.”

Now, fours years later, the case has finally been heard by the U.S. Supreme Court and a ruling has been made. In a 4-3 ruling on Thursday, it was decided that affirmative action is, in fact, constitutional.

“The Court’s affirmance of the University’s admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the University may rely on that same policy without refinement,” wrote Justice Anthony Kennedy. “It is the University’s ongoing obligation to engage in constant deliberation and continued reflection regarding its admission policies.”

While admission’s policies may be amended in the future, this ruling bolsters affirmative action programs across the country, making them legally stronger against subsequent discrimination suits, which, according to presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, is a “win for all Americans.”

“Having a student body with diverse experiences and perspectives breaks down barriers, enriches academia, and prepares our young people to be leaders and citizens in our increasingly diverse country,” she said.

  • 10614935101348454