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Sorority Spotlight: Kappa Delta At Albion College

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Think you know everything there is to know about sororities? Well, think again! Sororities are so much more than the stereotypical traits you might see in the media. That’s why at College Candy, we’re out to showcase some of the amazing work that sororities around the country are doing.

We recently got the chance to chat with the President of Kappa Delta’s Albion College chapter (aka Sigma Pi), Wendi Wang. We’re really blown away by all of what Kappa Delta has done for its community. The sorority focuses on its two charities, Girl Scouts of America and Prevent Child Abuse America. They’ve put on pancake breakfasts (yum!) to raise money for Prevent Child Abuse America and have made it their mission to be role models for the Girl Scouts in their local community. They’ve even put on events like “Be What You Want To Be Day” for the Girl Scouts, where they could dress up as anything from a firefighter to a doctor. They’re completely embodying girl power.

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Read on to find out what KD President Wendi Wang has to say about her sorority, philanthropy and college life.


What’s your favorite thing about your sorority?
I think my favorite thing is the size of our chapter and just the size of Albion’s campus…If I ever was having a bad day, I’d feel comfortable reaching out to any of my sisters. And so it’s just [great] that we all know each other and it’s not like that at bigger schools.

You feel like you have a sense of community through your sorority, right?
Yeah, definitely. We all know each other really well.

The charities that you focus on are Girl Scouts of America and Prevent Child Abuse America. Can you tell us a bit about that and the events that you put on?
Those are our national philanthropies. In the fall, what we traditionally do is a pancake breakfast for Prevent Child Abuse [America]. So, it will be on a Saturday morning and run for seven hours. We invite everyone’s parents, all of the community, all of the rest of Greek life and campus to our pancake breakfast. And obviously, at that time you pay $5 and get a bunch of really good food that we serve and cook. But also, there’s a lot of stuff for awareness for [Prevent] Child Abuse America. I think my favorite part of it is that a good portion of the money stays right in Calhoun County, so it’s local. And then the rest gets donated to national Prevent Child Abuse America.

And then for Girl Scouts? Do you help them sell cookies?
Yeah, we do that. Our former Sigma Pi Director of Community Service, Grace Martin, she actually attended every single one of their Girl Scouts meetings. She got really close with them. When we actually do our cookie sales, they all knew her and really respected her and looked up to her. So, we’ll sell cookies with them. And then during that time, we’re obviously helping them sell cookies but it’s also time for us to bond with them and hang out with them. One of the girls I was with last year, she was probably seven. I was done with my shift and about to leave and she wouldn’t let me leave. Every spring we do a campus tour with them. We’ll take them around campus, hang out with them. And then we also take them to all of the buildings around campus. We like to do women’s empowerment so we talk about important women in history. For example, Rosalind Franklin and her discovery of DNA. Just empowering these young girls in an educational setting. We also had a “Be What You Want To Be Day.” So, they all came to our lodge and dressed up like a firefighter or a doctor. Really cultivating their interests and promoting women’s empowerment from a young age. And especially at that young age, you are so vulnerable to everything. It’s important to have that strong female role model because not everyone has that.

What ways do you think that readers from all across the country can get involved with these charities? I know that they have a lot of sites for Girl Scout involvement. Are there any other ways that you can think of?
In terms of Girl Scouts, if you ever run into a Girl Scout troop and they’re with their troop leader or family selling cookies, they are so willing to make connections and have you help them sell cookies. They’re so willing [to have] someone help them. Just as simple as approaching them and going, “Hey, I’d love to help you sell cookies to all my college friends.”

What advice would you give to incoming freshman looking to get involved in Greek life?
Like I said before, because of the size of our campus, it’s more intimate than in a bigger setting. [Sorority life] is really not at all what you would expect from the movies. If you want to join Greek life because you think it’s gonna be partying and a popularity thing, it’s not worth it. The reality is that’s not what Greek life is. If you’re looking to build meaningful relationships and find people who have the same values, those are the reasons that you should be joining Greek life.

What is one thing that you would want readers unfamiliar with Greek life to know? Maybe to someone who’s already in college and has a certain idea of a sorority already in their head?
Greek life is very value-based. And I think that not everyone realizes that.

And when you say value-based, what exact values do you mean?
Just staying true to yourself, staying true to your sisterhood and having a group of sisters who, at the end of the day, are going to hold you accountable. They’re gonna support you for the good things that you do and they’re gonna hold you accountable for the not-so-good things that you do.

Are there any final thoughts that you have and want to share?
Yeah! Going back to my favorite thing about the house – I think my favorite thing about the house is that, when I joined the house, I never felt like I needed to become a different person. It’s probably the only place on campus that I can be vulnerable.

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  • COLLEGECANDY Writer
    Stephanie is currently studying Writing for Different Media at New York University. She's an avid TV watcher and massive pop culture fan.
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