Lindsey Vonn Net Worth 2018: How Much Is Lindsey Worth Now?

With 79 career wins, Lindsey Vonn is the most successful and decorated women’s skier in history. The award-winning alpine ski racer is one of the best-known athletes in winter sports. The 33-year-old US Olympian has won four World Cup overall championships along with a variety of other medals including the gold medal in downhill, five titles in super-G, three consecutive titles in the combined, and winning eight World Cup season titles in the downhill discipline. When Vonn won her 20th World Cup crystal globe title in 2016, she set a new all-time record among men and women.

Lindsey Vonn Net Worth as of 2018: $3 Million

Vonn’s career accolades speak volumes so let’s see how her hard work has paved the way for her decorated and accomplished career.


Early Life

Lindsey Caroline Kildow was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota to Linda Anne and Alan Lee Kildow. Vonn hit the snow relatively early and was on skis as early as two-years-old. To focus on her skiing, Vonn attended University of Missouri High School, which was an online program through the university’s Independent Study program. At 15-years-old Vonn got her first big break when she was named the first American female to take home the first place at Italy’s Trofeo Topolino.


2002-2005

In 2002 Vonn, age 17, made her Olympics debut when she raced in slalom and combined in Salt Lake City, Utah. The following year she earned a silver medal in downhill in the Junior World Championship in France. In 2004 Vonn was the downhill silver medalist at the U.S. Alpine Championship in Alaska. Vonn also made her way onto the World Cup podium that year when she placed third in downhill in January. Within the next two months, she would capture 5 more World Cup podiums. In 2005 Vonn competed in four races at her first World Championship in Italy and managed to pull in fourth place finishes in both the combined and the downhill. She ranked ninth in super-G but unfortunately didn’t finish the giant slalom.


2006-2010

Vonn’s second Winter Olympics in 2006 while clocking the second-best time in her first practice run, crashed in her second training run and was hospitalized overnight. With a bruised hip and intense pains, she returned just two days later and competed, finishing eighth. Her perseverance was met with admiration from fans, and she earned the U.S. Olympic Spirit Award.  The following year Von earned the silver in both downhill and super-G at the World Championships. Vonn’s win didn’t come without a few injuries though, and she suffered a low-level ACL sprain to her knee and ended her season early. Overall she finished third for the season in the women’s World Cup disciplines of downhill and super-G. 2008 would be an excellent year for Vonn when she won the overall World Cup title and becoming the second American woman to obtain the win. She also won the World Cup season title in the downhill, and the U.S. Alpine Championships combined title. Vonn also established a new all-time record for most World Cup downhill victories. In 2009 Vonn’s overall World Cup championship wins repeated along with her championship wins in the downhill and her season championship win in super-G. At the 2009 World Championship Vonn won her first world championship and became the first American woman to win the world super-G title. By the end of 2009, Vonn sustained another injury resulting in a bruised arm. Despite her handicap, Vonn won three straight races and also was named Colorado Athlete of the Year.  By 2010 Vonn had 33 World Cup victories under her belt. Vonn’s accomplishments became to pay off monetarily and by 2010 was making more than $500,000.


2011-2014

The next three years, Vonn’s career continued to expand along with her star athlete status.Despite losing the 2011 overall World Cup to Maria Riesch by 3 points Vonn’s earnings as an athlete grew along with her sponsorship deals. By the end of 2013, Vonn’s combined earnings from her sponsorships from brands like Under Armour, Oakley, Roley, Head, and Red Bull were valued at more than $3 million. Vonn was also taking home earnings from her skiing career and in 2012 took won her fourth and fifth Overall World Cup title consecutively. 2013 was a rough year for Vonn who suffered multiple injuries and illnesses which proved to set her back on the slopes.


2014-Present

View this post on Instagram

As I head to France for the next races, I would like to share with you my reflections from the past few days. I've received a tremendous amount of feedback, both positive and negative, about my recent CNN interview. The point that I was trying to articulate is that all Olympic athletes represent their nation as a whole, and are not representatives of their government or any specific political figure or party. None of us work tirelessly for years on end to compete in the Olympics on behalf of Democrats or Republicans. The Olympics are a non-political event, a chance for everyone to put aside their differences and be on the same "team.". That does not mean that Olympic athletes don't have political opinions. As an American, I am extremely proud that our great nation was founded on principals and ideals where citizens can express our opinions openly. It is a privilege that some others around the world don't have. I am proud to be an American, and I want our country to continue to be a symbol of hope, compassion, inclusion and world unity. My travels around the world have recently made clear that this is no longer how people view the United States. You cannot pick up a newspaper or turn on the TV in Europe without noticing how people are questioning our direction. It seems to me that we must lead with understanding and strive for unity in our relationships throughout the world. As for myself, my recent comments opened up my eyes as to how divided we are right now. It is hurtful to read comments where people are hoping I break my neck or that God is punishing me for being "anti-Trump." We need to find a way to put aside our differences and find common ground in communicating. Is it wrong to hope for a better world? All of this is much bigger than skiing and the Olympics. I am going to take the next two months to focus on what I can do and right now that is competing for my country. In doing that, I will be hoping that we Americans can still be that "shining city on a hill."

A post shared by L I N D S E Y • V O N N (@lindseyvonn) on

In 2014 Vonn’s attempt for a comeback was shortlived and despite wanting to press on wouldn’t fully make a comeback until the following year. At the 2015 World Championship Vonn won a bronze medal in the super-G. She placed 5th in the downhill race and 14th in the giant slalom race. In 2016 Vonn ventured out into other profitable business ventures including her foundation, her book, Strong Is the New Beautiful, and expanding her real estate portfolio with homes listed at more than $3 million. Over the last couple of years, Vonn’s expanded her sponsorships and has even designed a line with the sports brand Under Armour. Vonn’s injuries and recoveries while having slowed the decorated athlete down have not stopped her from performing. In 2018 she plans on returning to the slopes and participating in the Winter Olympics.

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