Friday The 13th: History, Myths & Popular Superstitions

Friday the 13th myths, superstitions and history

Shutterstock

We’d never thought we’d see the day where we are actually dreading Friday, but with today being Friday the 13th(aka the unluckiest day of the year), we have good reason to be dragging our feet. With so much chatter about Friday the 13th being the most dreadful day of the year, we’re here to clear up all the nasty (and sometimes silly) myths, rumors and superstitions of Friday the 13th. So just what is the history behind Friday the 13th? And why does it have such a negative connotation attached to it?

Take a look and get all the tea here about Friday the 13th.


History & Origin

After years of research, studies, investigations and tons of talk, the truth of the matter is that the origins of unprecedented fear surrounding Friday the 13th is still entirely unclear.  While there is no written evidence behind the Friday, the 13th stigma of it being a day of bad luck and all things terrible, word around town is that more than likely, this non-traditional and unwanted non-holiday started during the Medieval era as a way to forget about how terrible the Middle Ages were. The unconventional idea of creating an even more terrifying day to help forget about an entire era in history doesn’t quite seem like such a bad trade-off, but unfortunately for us, the lousy tradition has stuck.

Aside from the speculation of it coming from the medieval era, there are also some whispers that the real issue came with that of the number 13. These days depending on how you look it at, the number 13 is either considered to be incredibly lucky or the opposite. Well, back in the day, in Ancient Rome, the number 13 was a major cause for concern. Ancient Romans believed that at that time, witches gathered around in groups of 12 and a 13th member was thought to be the devil!

In biblical terms the number 13 was also considered to have some drama surrounding it. It’s said that before Jesus’ crucifixion, according to the Bible, there were 13 disciples present at the Last Supper. The 13th guest, however, was said to Judas who was ultimately responsible for Jesus’ death which also just so happened to be the next day(on a Friday).

The superstition behind that myth still reigns true today and is why at dinner parties, a 13th guest is considered to be the LAST thing you want.

Because of all the bad luck associated with Friday the 13th, during the Middle Ages, weddings were also generally held on any other day but Friday. Even though real weekends weren’t really introduced until around 1879, the bad luck associated with Fridays helped potentially shape why we have Saturdays and Sundays off now.

With the number 13 having such a bad rep, today many cities around the world will omit to have a 13th Street or Avenue, high-rise buildings avoiding the 13th floor, hospitals will avoid labeling rooms with the number 13 (due to its association with harm and death), and some airports will skip out on a Gate 13.


Popular Myths & Superstitions

Speaking of myths and superstitions, over the years, there have been so many myths and superstitions associated with the day, it’s sometimes hard to keep up. Here are the most popular ones to-date:

1. If a black cat crosses someone on Friday the 13th, then it could bring bad luck.

2. Ships that set sail on a Friday will have bad luck.

3. A child born on Friday the 13th will be unlucky for life.

4. Cutting your hair or nails on Friday 13th may cause a family member to die.

5. Calling a doctor on Friday 13th indicates a potentially fatal illness.

6. Breaking a mirror could bring seven years of bad luck.

7. If you start a long trip on Friday 13th, you will more than likely run into trouble.


Friday the 13th: More Than A Movie

While in the States Friday the 13th is considered to be the day of doom, in other countries, their numbers don’t quite add up. In Italian pop culture Friday the 17th is supposed to be a day to watch out for, while in several Asian countries like China and Korea, the 4th of the month is perceived as an unlucky day due to its association with death.

With so many discrepancies behind Friday the 13th, there’s one good thing to come from it–MOVIES! In Western culture Friday the 13th has become closely affiliated with some of today’s most famous horror movies today, making it a common way moviegoers pass their time on the unlucky day.

Take a look at the scariest movies of all time and let us know how you’ll be spending your Friday the 13th.

Friday the 13th myths, superstitions and history

Shutterstock

We’d never thought we’d see the day where we are actually dreading Friday, but with today being Friday the 13th(aka the unluckiest day of the year), we have good reason to be dragging our feet. With so much chatter about Friday the 13th being the most dreadful day of the year, we’re here to clear up all the nasty (and sometimes silly) myths, rumors and superstitions of Friday the 13th. So just what is the history behind Friday the 13th? And why does it have such a negative connotation attached to it?

Take a look and get all the tea here about Friday the 13th.


History & Origin

After years of research, studies, investigations and tons of talk, the truth of the matter is that the origins of unprecedented fear surrounding Friday the 13th is still entirely unclear.  While there is no written evidence behind the Friday, the 13th stigma of it being a day of bad luck and all things terrible, word around town is that more than likely, this non-traditional and unwanted non-holiday started during the Medieval era as a way to forget about how terrible the Middle Ages were. The unconventional idea of creating an even more terrifying day to help forget about an entire era in history doesn’t quite seem like such a bad trade-off, but unfortunately for us, the lousy tradition has stuck.

Aside from the speculation of it coming from the medieval era, there are also some whispers that the real issue came with that of the number 13. These days depending on how you look it at, the number 13 is either considered to be incredibly lucky or the opposite. Well, back in the day, in Ancient Rome, the number 13 was a major cause for concern. Ancient Romans believed that at that time, witches gathered around in groups of 12 and a 13th member was thought to be the devil!

In biblical terms the number 13 was also considered to have some drama surrounding it. It’s said that before Jesus’ crucifixion, according to the Bible, there were 13 disciples present at the Last Supper. The 13th guest, however, was said to Judas who was ultimately responsible for Jesus’ death which also just so happened to be the next day(on a Friday).

The superstition behind that myth still reigns true today and is why at dinner parties, a 13th guest is considered to be the LAST thing you want.

Because of all the bad luck associated with Friday the 13th, during the Middle Ages, weddings were also generally held on any other day but Friday. Even though real weekends weren’t really introduced until around 1879, the bad luck associated with Fridays helped potentially shape why we have Saturdays and Sundays off now.

With the number 13 having such a bad rep, today many cities around the world will omit to have a 13th Street or Avenue, high-rise buildings avoiding the 13th floor, hospitals will avoid labeling rooms with the number 13(due to its association with harm and death), and some airports will skip out on a Gate 13.


Popular Myths & Superstitions

Speaking of myths and superstitions, over the years, there have been so many myths and superstitions associated with the day, it’s sometimes hard to keep up. Here are the most popular ones to-date:

1. If a black cat crosses someone on Friday the 13th, then it could bring bad luck.

2. Ships that set sail on a Friday will have bad luck.

3. A child born on Friday the 13th will be unlucky for life.

4. Cutting your hair or nails on Friday 13th may cause a family member to die.

5. Calling a doctor on Friday 13th indicates a potentially fatal illness.

6. Breaking a mirror could bring seven years of bad luck.

7. If you start a long trip on Friday 13th, you will more than likely run into trouble.


Friday the 13th: More Than A Movie

While in the States Friday the 13th is considered to be the day of doom, in other countries, their numbers don’t quite add up. In Italian pop culture Friday the 17th is supposed to be a day to watch out for, while in several Asian countries like China and Korea, the 4th of the month is perceived as an unlucky day due to its association with death.

With so many discrepancies behind Friday the 13th, there’s one good thing to come from it–MOVIES! In Western culture Friday the 13th has become closely affiliated with some of today’s most famous horror movies today, making it a common way moviegoers pass their time on the unlucky day.

Take a look at the scariest movies of all time and let us know how you’ll be spending your Friday the 13th.

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