Lori Loughlin’s Daughter Olivia Jade Was Too “Confused” To Fill Out Her Own College Applications

Last week Operation Varsity Blues, a college admission bribery scandal, shook America. Rich people allegedly illegally bribed and paid their kids’ way into being accepted into college. Among those people were actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman.

Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, allegedly paid a total of $500,000 to have their two daughters Isabella Rose and Olivia Jade accepted to the University of Southern California.

Lori Loughlin and her daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose at the 2017 Teen Choice Awards

FayesVision/WENN.com

Not only did Olivia get illegally accepted into the university, but she supposedly didn’t even fill out her own college applications. The 204-page affidavit detailing the crimes that took place in Operation Varsity Blues allege that Olivia was “confused” filling out her USC application and needed guidance.

Loughlin emailed Rick SInger, the man who admitted to being behind the cheating scandal, about Olivia filling out a college application. Despite being accepted illegally through a student-athlete bribe, Olivia still needed to fill out a formal college application.

Olivia Jade Giannulli at the The Women's Cancer Research Fund's An Unforgettable Evening Benefit Gala

Dave Bedrosian/Future Image/WENN.com

“On or about December 12, 2017, Loughlin e-mailed [Singer], copying Giannulli and their younger daughter, to request guidance on how to complete the formal USC application in the wake of her daughter’s provisional acceptance as a recruited athlete,” the affidavit states.

The document continues, “Loughlin wrote: “[Our younger daughter] had not submitted all her colleges [sic] apps and is confused on how to do so. I went to make sure she gets those in as I don’t want to call any attention to [her] with our little friend at [her high school]. Can you tell us how to proceed?”

The little friend Loughlin is referring to is Olivia’s high school guidance counselor. According to the affidavit, Olivia’s school counselor was asking questions about Olivia and Isabella and inquiring if they actually participated in crew. The counselor was concerned that their acceptances into USC were misleading because they weren’t student-athletes.

“[Singer] responded by directing an employee to submit the applications on behalf of the Giannullis’ younger daughter,” the affidavit concluded.

Based on the affidavit, one of Singer’s employees filled out Olivia’s USC application for her. Not only did she not actually get accepted into the school she didn’t even fill out her own application because she was too “confused” on how to do so.

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