This Is What Happened To College Admissions After The Scandal

It’s to no secret that the parents of wealthy high school students can bribe their children’s way into college. Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman are just two of the most well-known names on a long list of parents being held accountable for their actions.

Lori Loughlin at the Disney's Mary Poppins Returns Premiere and Felicity Huffman at the 2018 Emmys

Sheri Determan/FayesVision/WENN.com

Over dozens of America’s wealthiest parents are buying their children spots on athletic teams they would never make and into classrooms they don’t belong in. The bringing to light of such scandals has revealed not only the power of money in America but just how competitive the college admissions system is as well. Coinciding with the exposure of these wrongdoings, some of the most elite private schools are experiencing a record-holding low number in admission rates.

According to an article published by The New York Times, the admissions rate at Yale plummeted from last year’s 6.31 percent to 5.91 percent. This equates to 2,178 students out of a record-setting group of 36,843. At the University of Southern California, the admissions rate dropped 11 percent, receiving only 66,000 freshman applicants, the lowest number they’ve ever gotten. At Harvard, dropping .1 percent, it is clear that even the most recognized universities are being affected by current events.

A vital name left out of many headlines is that of William Singer. The founder of Edge College & Career Network, a college preparatory business also known as The Key, used the nonprofit to help students cheat on standardized tests. Singer also assisted in orchestrating bribes for coaches who could get students into college with fake athletic backgrounds.

Singer, using The Key as a facade, helped parents funnel money into an account without paying federal taxes. According to another article published in The New York Times, Singer was paid roughly $25million from 2011 until this February to bribe coaches and administrators and ensure their admission to designated schools.

Pleading guilty in court, Singer is responsible for much more than what he is charged with. The trust the public has in American education systems, and the college admissions process has dropped dramatically. Evident in the numbers, will universities be able to recover from the revelation of such scandals?

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