Top 10 Facts About the Fourth of July

As we slowly approach the 4th of July holiday, you will begin to see people grocery shopping and going to the malls or outlets to find the perfect holiday fit. But do Americans genuinely know the meaning of Independence Day? Some may be aware of a couple of facts while, some are entirely in the dark and are just merely celebrating the holiday for family time, free food, and beer. Here are the top 10 facts about the 4th of July.


1. In 1870, the 4th of July officially became an unpaid federal holiday.

American patriotic colors design

Shutterstock

2. By 1938, the U.S. Congress made Independence Day a paid national holiday.

Silhouettes of Americans celebrating Independence Day and holding flags.

Shutterstock

3. American Revolution leader John Hancock, was the only person who signed The Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. All the other signatures came at a later date.

An illustration of John Hancock signing the Declaration of Independence.

Shutterstock

4. Two politicians later became presidents after the Declaration of Independence was signed: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

George Washington, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson on gold coins displayed on a white background.

Shutterstock

5. The first Independence Day celebration took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 8, 1776. That’s four days after the Declaration of Independence was written.

A statue of John Adams outside of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Shutterstock

6. July 8, 1776, is also the day that the Declaration of Independence was first to read in public, after summoning citizens to listen by ringing the Liberty Bell.

The liberty bell at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Shutterstock

7. When the Declaration of Independence was signed, Thomas Jefferson, who was also the lead author of the Declaration of Independence was 33 years old, at the time.

A portrait of Thomas Jefferson

Shutterstock

8. The White House held it’s first Independence Day party on July 4, 1801. That’s twenty-five years later from when the Declaration of Independence was signed.

Independence Day fireworks displayed on an evening sky

Shutterstock

9. In 1776, the American population was 2.5 million. As of 2018, there are 327.2 million people that take up the American people.

American youth in front of an American flag background

Shutterstock

10. Former president Benjamin Franklin proposed that the national bird be a turkey. However, he was overruled by John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who decided the national bird would be the bald eagle.

Bald eagle in blue sky background

Shutterstock

Kim Kardashian To Rename Shapewear Line After Backlash: Details
Kim Kardashian To Rename Shapewear Line After Backlash: Details
Read More:
News
  • 10614935101348454