The 5 Most Popular Vaping Myths Debunked

The popularity of vaping has exploded over recent years. While cigarette smoking in the US is at an all-time low, vape use among youth has increased by almost 80 percent, according to the FDA, and high school and college students are among the heaviest users. By now the iconic, USB drive-resembling, battery-powered e-cigarettes are a familiar staple of campus life. New models, constantly released, have gone by many names: vaporizer, vape pen, or JUUL. They come in an alluring variety of aromatic flavors, including bubblegum, fruit medley, mint, mango, and creme brulee.

As the market for vape has continued to rise, the country’s response has grown increasingly negative. The sixth death to be linked to vape was reported in a CNN article.

First Lady Melania Trump recently denounced vape on Twitter, and received very mixed responses.

In some colleges, vaping is so widespread that their administrations are taking active measures to stop vaping on campus. More than 1,880 schools, including Skidmore College and West Virginia University, have updated their smoking rules to declare vape-free campuses. Meanwhile, in other schools vaping is so normalized that according to Insider, students at New York University feel comfortable enough to vape with their professors. At many schools, like the University of Houston, the vape smoke in class is so rampant that professors often explicitly ban them in their syllabi.

Most impactful to the vape industry, President Trump is currently preparing a federal ban on flavored electronic cigarettes. Flavored vaping products have already been banned in Michigan, and on Saturday Governor Cuomo announced a move for an emergency order to ban them in New York.

Because much is still unknown about it, the health effects of vape remain a hotly contested topic. In college life especially, a myriad of mistaken assumptions surround vaping. These 5 myths about vape, debunked, will help to clear up some of the most widespread wrong ideas about how dangerous vaping actually is.

Vape is made up of harmless water vapor.

One of the most common misconceptions, that vape is just water vapor, is based on the fact that vape smoke lacks tobacco. Many assume that since vape contains no tobacco smoke, it must be harmless. But actually, the flavor in vape products, called aerosol, produced by heating a liquid composed of chemicals, metals, and nicotine extracted from tobacco, can cause irreversible lung damage.


Vape is less addictive than regular cigarettes.

Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, one of the most addictive substances, experts say, along with cocaine and heroin. With vape products, it is possible to amp up the dosage of nicotine to much higher levels than a tobacco product would. Some vapes, to help the user reach a better high, contain as much nicotine as 20 packs of cigarettes. Because of the popularity of vape, an entire generation of millennials is getting hooked on nicotine. Besides addiction, there are other known harmful effects of nicotine on the heart, lungs, kidneys and reproductive system. Sustained nicotine exposure can lead to high blood pressure and diabetes.

vape models

Shutterstock

Vaping is a good way to quit smoking.

Although e-cigarettes have been marketed as a way to kick the smoking habit, studies show they are not so effective at this, but they are often a gateway to smoking traditional cigarettes as well as e-cigarettes. Ironically, there have been cases of kids turning to smoking to break the nicotine addiction they got from vaping. A survey by the Food and Drug Administration revealed that most kids who’ve used tobacco started with a flavored product.


E-cigarettes can’t cause cancer.

Vape liquid is full of substances that are classified as probable carcinogens. A few of the chemicals commonly found in the aerosol in vape are acrolein, which can harm the lungs, and formaldehyde, another irritant and probable carcinogen. Also present in aerosol are heavy metals and ultra-fine particles which can be inhaled deep into the lungs, causing all kinds of health problems. Although the link between e-cigarettes and cancer is unclear, based on what research has been done it is also impossible to rule it out.


Second-hand vape smoke is safe.

According to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 40 percent of U.S. adults believe that exposure to secondhand aerosol from e-cigarettes poses few health risks. This myth most likely caught on because unlike tobacco cigarettes, chemicals aren’t released into the air by lighting up the device itself. However, this doesn’t protect a person across the room from exposure to the smoke a vape user exhales. A person with asthma, emphysema or other lung problems will be set off by breathing in irritants and toxins in the vape smoke. Just because more secondhand smoke might be emitted from a traditional cigarette does not mean that a cloud of secondhand vape is not also harmful.

vaping in an enclosed public space exposes others to secondhand smoke

Shutterstock

The more information about e-cigarettes continues to be uncovered, the more complete our knowledge about the effects of vape will be. But one thing we can say for certain is that vaping isn’t the way to healthy lungs or a healthy lifestyle. Now with a better understanding of these 5 myths about vaping, find out what 10 college students had to say about their experiences vaping and make up your own mind about e-cigarettes.

 

New Mexico Proposes a Free Tuition Program for ALL
  • 10614935101348454