This Study Says That If You Fake An Orgasm, It Could Be Non-Consensual Sex

In this day and age, “faking it” is definitely a norm when it comes to talking about orgasms. Over 80 percent of women admit to faking an orgasm during at least one sexual encounter in their lives.

Women of all ages fake an orgasm at some point for various reasons. Some cite that they do not want to hurt their partner’s feelings or say that they just want the encounter to end. However, the second reason raises an interesting question: if you want to get out of it, is the sex consensual?

Researchers at the British Psychological Society found that a forged orgasm corresponds with non-consensual sex. They asked 15 women between the ages of 19 to 28 to discuss situation where they were “faking it” during consensual encounters. Although the women were told to talk about this in terms of consensual sex, all women described encounters that were considered to be non-consensual sex by researchers and experts.

The study showed that women were more likely to identify these unpleasant and unwanted encounters as “bad experiences” instead of rape.

It was noted by Teen Vogue that this study could explain quite a lot if looked through the lens of sexual assault. Far too frequently after a complaint of non-consensual sex is made, the perpetrator claims that the victim “enjoyed it,” which suggests that the individual sees an orgasm or any hint of arousal as a sign of consent.

In reality, faking pleasure could be a coping mechanism or strategy to end the encounter entirely.

[Story via]

It’s True, Chickpeas May Not Be Around For Much Longer
It’s True, Chickpeas May Not Be Around For Much Longer
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