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Why Katy Perry Opening Up About Her Suicidal Thoughts Is So Important

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Katy Perry Racist

Christopher Polk/Getty

Singer Katy Perry has been live-streaming her life on Youtube to fans since yesterday (June 9), and while we anticipated a Big Brother-esque video stream of Perry promoting her album in different capacities, Perry instead got decidedly more vulnerable, bringing the cameras with her to her therapy session.

On Friday night, the pop star live-streamed the session, getting candid about her suicidal thoughts, and choking back tears while speaking about trying to live a more authentic life.

She explained that she has been trying to figure out who she is separate from her “pop persona,” and that is why she cut all of her hair off — in an effort to make a connection with Kathryn Hudson, her true self, Glamour reports.

“I’m a bit more nerdy than everybody thinks I am, I’m just a big goofball,” she revealed. “I didn’t really know how to play as a kid. I just learned how to hug.”

The therapy session then took a more serious turn, as Perry began speaking about her struggles with alcohol to her therapist, prompting someone to suggest she turn off the livestream, News.au reports.

She did not.

“I wrote a song about it,” she continued. “I feel ashamed that I would have those thoughts, feel that low and that depressed. You can be right or you can be loved. I just want to be loved.”

While live-streaming a therapy session is an usual way to show vulnerability — and may well be an effort to humanize the star to her fans — Perry disclosing her suicidal thoughts in such an open manner is a huge step forward in shattering mental health stigma.

Live-streaming her therapy session isn’t beneficial because it shows us a new side to the pop star. Live-streaming her therapy session is beneficial because,  like this season’s The Bachelorette episodes and a thousand tiny revelations from celebrities over the course of the last decade, it helps to normalize therapy and remove stigma from a beneficial and (for many) necessary practice. It cannot be said often enough how powerful that is.

COLLEGECANDY Writer
Writer. Boxed mac & cheese aficionado. I tried to start a girl-band when I was 12.