Troian Bellisario Calls Out Photoshop Culture In Powerful Instagram Post

Troian Bellisario Spencer Hastings PLL cast

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Troian Bellisario has spoken out extensively about her disordered eating this year, penning an emotional Lenny Letter recalling her lowest moments and even writing and starring in a powerful film to educate the public on the long and oftentimes unrewarding recovery process for survivors.

Now, the former on-screen evil British twin is using her platform to slam photoshopped images that are passed off as authentic.

She shared a video on Instagram about a law in France that requires models to get doctors’ notes alleging their health before they can book jobs and asks photoshopped images to have labels saying as much.

While Bellisario is opposed to the first half of the law, which she argues would discriminate against thin people and make it so people with disordered eating cannot work, she agrees that photoshopped images should be labelled as such.

View this post on Instagram

Thank you @attndotcom for sharing this. I do not agree with all of this. I do not want to BODY SHAME Naturally thin women nor do I want to dictate whether or not they should work based on weight or whether or not they have a mental illness (ED) HOWEVER the thing I love about this is we in America Should have MANDITORY WARNINGS on images in ADvertisements & PRESS that have been doctored. Because the real issue (in my opinion) is that we are selling products (clothes, perfume, music, film) on unrealistic and doctored images of people. And I for one would want to know, I would want my friends to know and strangers and especially young men and women to know if they were looking at something real or something fake. Because then we can see clearly that we are being sold products on the basis of first making ourselves feel less than (not pretty enough not skinny enough not healthy enough whatever) so we “need to buy this product to be like the person in the ad. And feel better about ourselves” Well guess what. The person in the ad doesn’t even look like that. What an amazing world it would be if we could just acknowledge that. And then celebrate that we all look different, have different bodies and different backgrounds and histories, and then find all of those differences beautiful. Happy Saturday.

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“The real issue (in my opinion) is that we are selling products… on unrealistic and doctored images of people,” she wrote.”I would want my friends to know and strangers and especially young men and women to know if they were looking at something real or something fake.”

“The person in the ad doesn’t even look like that,” she continued. “What an amazing world it would be if we could just acknowledge that.”

Her point is a powerful one. A 2016 study illuminated that girls start to resent and pick apart their bodies as young as seven years old. A full 40 percent of 7-10-year-olds admitted to feeling ashamed of their bodies.

Photoshop and the overuse of societally-deemed “perfect” women on magazines, advertisements, and billboards only perpetuates the myth that women ought to fit into an impossible mold, one that even the models on said billboards don’t fit.

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